Monkeypox in Latin America, Michelle Bachelet, Tigray… Thursday’s news

Monkeypox in Latin America, Michelle Bachelet, Tigray… Thursday’s news

The WHO warns of the increase in cases of monkeypox in Latin America

The World Health Organization warns of the increase in cases of monkeypox in Latin America due to lack of awareness and access to vaccines.

Last week, the number of reported cases fell by more than 20% globally, although new cases increased in the Americas with the United States being the country with the largest increase.

The Organization said there are signs the outbreak is easing in Europe, where a combination of effective public health measures, behavior change and vaccination are helping to prevent transmission.

“However, in Latin America in particular, insufficient public health awareness and measures are being combined with a lack of access to vaccines for fan the flames of the outbreak”, explained Dr. Tedros Adhanom Gebreyesus, the director general of the WHO.

The manufacturer of a vaccine, Bavarian Nordic, signed an agreement with the Pan American Health Organizationthe regional branch of the Organization, to support access to its vaccine in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Bachelet: “The work to defend human rights never ends”

© OHCHR

Michelle Bachelet at the press conference to take stock of her mandate in Geneva

“The work to defend human rights never ends,” said High Commissioner Michelle Bachelet at the press conference to assess her mandate. Bachelet acknowledged that the “world has not improved” in the last four years and that she has received “strong pressure”.

Bachelet lamented that the pandemic prevented her from traveling to more countries and that the outbreak of the war in Ukraine diverted all attention when the UN was advancing on a “common agenda” to address the great global challenges.

“A lot of times it's very frustrating not being able to go any further and sometimes you feel like the world isn't getting any better.”

Regarding Latin America, the former Chilean president said that since she visited Venezuela in 2019 there has been progress, which has materialized in the presence of its Office in the country. The High Commissioner pointed out that “probably next week” she will have a conversation with President Nicolás Maduro, because she does not want “the promises to be forgotten” and the “long list of things to do” that the UN has demanded.

Bachelet said that dialogue between the government and the opposition in Venezuela is “essential” and encouraged them to resume it ahead of the 2024 presidential elections.

“I hope that they resume so that there are some agreements and that the next elections are held in a transparent and fair manner. That way everyone will feel that the results really represent what the Venezuelan people want,” he said.

As to Mexico, He said that it is necessary to maintain the civilian nature of the National Guard. “The use of armed forces in public security must be exceptional and supervised by civilian bodies,” he assured.

From the report on the human rights situation of the Uyghurs, a minority settled in the province of Xinjiang in Chinaacknowledged that he has been under “tremendous pressure” both for it to be published and for it not to be published, but that this “will not define how things will be” and insisted that they “try” to publish it before the end of their mandate once they review the Chinese government's comments.

Cluster bombs leave 689 civilians dead and wounded in Ukraine


Critical infrastructure and heavily damaged residential areas in the northeastern region of Ukraine following the 2022 Russian invasion.

Courtesy of Revival NGO

Critical infrastructure and heavily damaged residential areas in the northeastern region of Ukraine following the 2022 Russian invasion.

Cluster munition attacks in Ukraine have resulted in at least 689 civilian deaths or injuries.

Until the 40% of these weapons do not explode on impact, posing a serious threat to the local population for years.

The use of cluster munitions in Ukraine occurred mainly in populated areas. In addition to killing and injuring civilians, it has also damaged civilian infrastructure: houses, hospitals, schools, factories, playgrounds, etc. Cluster munition attacks also threatened internally displaced persons and those seeking humanitarian aid.

WFP fuel theft in Tigray will cause more hunger


Displaced family in Asgede district in Tigray, Ethiopia, receives food assistance from WFP.

WFP / Claire Nevill

Displaced family in Asgede district in Tigray, Ethiopia, receives food assistance from WFP.

The director of World Food Program has demanded that the authorities in Tigray, Ethiopia, immediately return fuel stocks stolen by a group of armed men who entered the organization's compound in Mekelle and forcibly seized 12 tankers filled with more than half a million liters of fuel.

“This fuel had been recently purchased by WFP and arrived just a few days before it was stolen. Without it, it is impossible for WFP to distribute food, fertilizer, medicine and other emergency supplies throughout Tigray.”said David Beasley, pointing out that it was reprehensible that millions of people were being pushed further into hunger by renewed fighting in northern Ethiopia.

In recent months, the humanitarian truce has enabled WFP and its partners to reach nearly five million people in Tigray. However, that vital supply line was severed yesterday, Beasley said.

“The loss of this fuel will push communities in Tigray, who are already struggling with the impacts of the conflict, on the verge of starvation”, he added.

Top Health Story